Dragobete

Dragobete

Dragobete is a traditional Romanian holiday originating from Dacian times and celebrated on February 24. Dragobete was the son of Baba Dochia, which stands for the main character in the pagan myth related to spring arrival and the end of the harsh winter.

The Dragobete traditional story goes that, clothed with holiday suits, young men and women meet in front of the church and go searching the woods and meadows for spring flowers. They sit around fire on the hills of the village and talk. At noon, the girls run to the village, each followed by one boy who had fallen for them. If the boy is fast and reaches the girl of his choice and if she likes him, she kisses him in front of everyone.  This tradition triggered the expression “Dragobete kisses the girls!” (Dragobetele saruta fetele). The kiss show the two lovers’ engagement, Dragobete being an opportunity to show the love in front of the community.

There are a number of Dragobete customs in rural areas, many of which are not kept by modern Romanians anymore. On this day, no animals are sacrificed because it would ruin the point of mating. In the old days, single women used to gather the last remnants of snow, called “the fairies’ snow”, and the water resulted from the melted snow was used throughout the year for various beauty treatments and love spells.

    
     

The students in our school celebrate “Dragobete” every year because our community is fond of our traditions, which need to be passed from one generation to another.

The 2014 edition of “Dragobete” was organized by the Students’ Council in collaboration with The Ethnography Club (coordinating teacher Tiu Cosmina) and the Drama Club (coordinating teacher Barbura Felicia).